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Description:
Fiji Water had a 20' X 20' booth at the Natural Products Expo in March. I think they should be the poster child for this site!

RATINGS & COMMENTS

3.6Jensen’s
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While Fiji is doing a good job at reducing their carbon emissions (going carbon neutral), this is not an excuse for making people think that drinking bottled water is a "green" thing to do. Trumpet your accomplishments, but don't pretend that bottled water itself can be completely green, because it has fundamentally unsustainable characteristics.

4.8sutherix’s
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There is nothing, absolutely nothing more absurd than claiming that bottled water is somehow an environmentally acceptable choice. Bottled water is the poster child for what is wrong with American consumer culture. People know this, consequently it is one of the best vehicles for greenwash. In general, there is an inverse relationship between unsustainable luxury and susceptiblility to greenwash. Bottled water is the penultimate examplar of this rule. On Fiji's web site, they have all sorts of rubbish about container deposit laws and how states that utilize this mechanism have high recycling rates. A much better mechanism is a tax on the raw materials destined for the packaging with the revenue diverted to subsidizing products made from recylced materials. Under this paradigm, the consumer pays the full costs of the luxury of over packaging. Also, manufacturers of products made of post consumer recycled materials have a leg up on competitors that utiize raw materials.

4.8Rockstar’s
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Carbon nuetrality is also a joke. It allows company's to simply buy their way green without changing behavior. Not only is it water in a PLASTIC BOTTLE, it is pumped from FIJI and then shipped here. Every drop is definitely greenwash.

4.2Wheepickle’s
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To add insult to injury, I attented this show and to may great dismay found extremely limited recycling opportunities for all the paper, bottles and cans that these companies were handing out. Fiji included! I witnessed mounds of plactic bottles ending up in the garbage at a show that talks about environmental issues :(

5.0SeaTail’s
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Without a clear message about why Fiji water is greener than any competitor (including the tap) this is straight-up greenwashing.

4.2frigoa’s
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Fiji is actually among the worst environmental offenders. Its bottle labels contain the most benzene rings (to make them shine and glitter).

5.0Paco’s
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If they really want to be green, better sell water in their ownn area, in greener container, reusable 8 or 16 liters glass bottle. Sending water overseas is unnecessary unless you get a big revenue as it's that case. This company is not a green company.

5.0Jouhl’s
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I don't understand how bottled water could be green. Its not possible when there are alternatives to using a disposable bottle such as reusing a glass bottle.

5.0Whitebuddha’s
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Bottled Water?! Is there really anything else to say?? Oh, wait, bottled water from Fiji, being bought in North America; make sense? Think NOT!

5.0ardenmcc’s
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Shipping water from Fiji, then trucking it across the country in plastic bottles. Think of the carbon footprint for a drink of water! Total greenwashing as far as I am concerned.

4.6georgeslacombe’s
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Bottled Water is definitely not a green thing.

3.9twit666’s
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Sutherix, I don't think penultimate means what you think it means. It means, "next to last".

5.0astafford64’s
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Every Drop is Green=The company claims that all carbon emissions are offset, but not only offset, but by 120% so consumers are actually helping the planet by buying their product. Reality=The company has been saying this since 2007 and hasn't even come close to planting all of the trees and reducing their impact to make the claim even somewhat real. Even worse, even if they did get all of the trees planted, it will take the whole lifetime of the trees to offset the carbon, that is if none of them get cut down over the next century.